from Bad Blues to Good Blues

I’d already painted some of the more interestingly-shaped islands in the Indian Ocean, so I’ve decided to move on to the Atlantic.
The relative scarcity of islands in that ocean combined with some sort of nutritional/chemical imbalance within me led me to just pick any ol’ island and “start doing something” to keep myself distracted from boredom or self-pity or whatever. A bad case of “the blues”. After doing a little bit of “dry” geometry and using good ol’ fashioned drafting technique, the five-lobed repetitive arrangement seemed to make sense, so I traced and cut out masks for the glare-like drybrush technique to make the harsh (“mars-like”, even) island landscape somewhat representative of reality, relatively. A smudge of just the wrong green where the island’s only truly vegetated area is (appropriately called “Green Mountain”) completed the land.
As the paint dried I wondered how – and even IF – I could make such ugliness into something less-difficult to look at. At that point, making it genuinely pretty seemed out of the question. IMG_0011onefourth
I decided to document the process a bit and took a snapshot. Once it was in GIMP I inverted the colors as a goof.
IMG_0011onefourthNEG
The inverse of the bad green was a delicate pink, so I decided to make the “ocean currents” near that part of the island a similar color. Later on I was quite pleased with myself for having done that, and as I worked my way towards the outside with blues and white, decided to make the outside “currents” darker, which I did in a somewhat patchwork fashion.

There comes a point, when creating a work of art, no matter how well-thought-out the piece, when the artist must step away and stop and ask “where do I go from here?”

The few “thorny” current extensions I’d already painted looked organic so I just extended the little blue outline I’d started, touched up the rest of the edge-currents, and decided that I could not improve on what I’d done.

Ascention Island Flower onethird

That particular outer blue seems to tie the whole painting together. A very good blue, I must say.